A literary analysis of lysistrata and the peloponnesian war

The Peloponnesian War occurred between B. Because the Acropolis was viewed as a political structure, the fact that the women were utilizing it for their plotting against the war portrays the idea that they were gaining more political power.

He was born in Kydathenaion, a deme or subdivision of Classical Athens, some fifty years after the Athenian statesman Cleisthenes b. The peace talks commence and Lysistrata introduces the Spartan and Athenian delegates to a gorgeous naked young woman called Reconciliation or Peace, whom the delegates cannot take their eyes off.

When Lysistrata first explained her plan to the women, they refused because they did not want to deny themselves pleasure. Some estimates that a third of a generation of young men was killed in war. Lysisitrata persuades the women of Athens to withdraw all sexual favours from the men until the men agree to end to war with Sparta.

Lysistrata restores some order after the fracas, and allows the magistrate to question her about her scheme and the war.

Lysistrata

While the men are fully distracted by Peace, Lysistrata lectures them on the need for reconciliation between the states of Greece. Rather than giving up on the women and allowing the war to continue, Lysistrata pushed the women to succeed in the original plan: Arguably more important, Lysistrata and the women seize control of the Acropolis, and the treasury — controlling the funding for the war against Sparta — giving them real economic and political power.

Both the Athenians and Spartans were Greek, after all, and allies in the Greco-Persian Wars that ended only some twenty years before the Peloponnesian War began.

Lysistrata Analysis

This power struggle emphasizes the issues that are still apparent in issues in foreign countries regarding the rights of women. Gender Roles Themes and Colors LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Lysistrata, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Athens was then defeated by Sparta. Lysistrata tells the Commissioner that war is a concern of women because women have sacrificed greatly for it—women have given their husbands and their sons to the effort.

Myrrhine refuses to have intercourse with Kinesias until peace exists between Athens and Sparta. Athens was the Greek center of commerce, politics and society. Both the Athenians and Spartans were Greek, after all, and allies in the Greco-Persian Wars that ended only some twenty years before the Peloponnesian War began.

He was born in Kydathenaion, a deme or subdivision of Classical Athens, some fifty years after the Athenian statesman Cleisthenes b.

Indeed, the very idea that a woman could have enough influence to end a war would have been considered quite ridiculous to the Greek audience members. Along with a chorus of women who have already seized the Acropolis, Lysistrata and her band of female revolutionaries defend themselves against a chorus of old men who try to smoke them out of the Acropolis.

Other Books Related to Lysistrata Aristophanes was the high prince of the Greek Old Comedy, a genre distinctive for its scathing political and cultural satire as well as for its exuberant sexual and scatological obscenity.

Delegations from both states then meet at the Akropolis to discuss peace. It has been suggested by several critics that Aristophanes chose to make women invade and capture the Akropolis because they were the lowest beasts of Greek culture.

The Chorus of old women make overtures to the old men, and soon the two Choruses merge, singing and dancing in unison. For example, instead of having one Chorus as was traditional, the play has a Chorus divided into two quarrelling factions: The women, however, take charge by quickly putting out the fire.

But then we should also bear in mind that Lysistrata is a comedy, and whilst comedies often contain serious ideas, there is often a carnivalesque sense of the overturning of the usual roles and conventions.

Lysistrata is an unusual Greek comedy because it has not one chorus, but two — one comprising men and the other comprising women though of course, both choruses would have been played by men in the original Greek theatre. A Koryphaios leads both choruses.Welcome to the LitCharts study guide on Aristophanes's Lysistrata.

Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides. Aristophanes lived and wrote during a time of grandiose greed and political ambition in Classical Athens, when populism and demagoguery. “Lysistrata” is a bawdy anti-war comedy by the ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes, first staged in BCE.

It is the comic account of one woman's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War, as Lysistrata convinces the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands as a means of forcing the men to negotiate a.

Literary Analysis, Translations - Lysistrata, by Aristophanes. My Account. Lysistrata, by Aristophanes Essay. Lysistrata, by Aristophanes Essay He proceeds to show the absurdity of the Peloponnesian War by staging a battle of the sexes in front of the Acropolis, worshipping place of Athena. Tied into all of this is the role of sex and.

This darkness is the long war that has been raging on between Athens and Sparta, and that has recently taken a turn for the worse (f Three-Act Plot Analysis Even though this is a play—and plays are supposed to have Acts, right?—all of the action in Lysistrata happens in one big chunk.

*Athens.

Interesting Literature

Capital and city-state of the peninsula of Attica, a province of east central Greece. Firmly established as a cultural, political, and commercial center by b.c.e., Athens became an imperialistic empire and naval power.

In b.c.e. it began its war with Sparta, the powerful city-state of southern Greece’s Peloponnesian Peninsula. Table of Contents Summary Summary Part 2 Summary Part 3 Summary Part 4 Summary Part 5 Literary Analysis Literary Analysis Part 2 Further Resources Lysistrata was written in BC, during a time when for the past 30 years the peninsula had been consumed by war.

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A literary analysis of lysistrata and the peloponnesian war
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